Gints Gabrāns - Artist 
Photonpainting "Photon paintings. Landscapes" 2010
Photonpainting Photon painting. Landscape # 33.
126 x 208
Photonpainting Photon painting. Landscape # 32.
126 x 204
Photonpainting Photon painting. Landscape # 10.
126 x 224
Photonpainting Photon painting. Landscape # 3.
126 x 204
Photonpainting Photon painting. Landscape # 12.
126 x 200
Photonpainting Photon painting. Landscape # 85.
126 x 180
Photonpainting Photon painting. Landscape # 49.
126 x 204
Photonpainting
Fragments:

Photonpainting

Photonpainting

Photonpainting

‘The Bright Sky’ 2010. Unique laser light graphics on photography paper, aluminium, varnished. Each work ~ 130 x 205 cm, video 8’, Projection film. Watermans New Media Gallery, London, England.

The works in the "Photon Landscapes" series are painted with light. The light projection on the surface of the painting-photographic paper is created by passing a white laser beam through a small drop of water. In this drop the laser beam splits into all the colours of the rainbow and through the diffraction and interference of electromagnetic waves, unusual and beautiful patterns and structures are formed on the painting, as if from nowhere.
During the work process, the projection is dispersed from a tiny point on a huge scale all around the darkened space of the studio forming landscapes of an invisible world. When I look at them I feel like a landscape artist who has gone out to paint in the open air in a parallel world, not an abstract but a very concrete one.
In my works I want to show the Invisible. When we look at rainbow, there are no arcs of colour there in the sky, only electromagnetic waves that in the water droplets split into various angles which our brains interpret as colours. A similar optical process acts on the light sensitive surface of photographic paper in the reaction to the various photochemical elements there. When we look at a painting, we see only the light reflected in it in which the chemical elements have absorbed various wavelengths creating the illusion of colours for us. What the painting actually looks like we don't know however, when I talk about my paintings, I say: "…look at that blue, or at that red."